Resources/contacts

If you or someone you know is having problems with drugs, help is available at:

Alcohol and Drug 24-Hour Helpline
800-562-1240

First Call for Help
24 Hour Crisis Hotline
509-838-4428

Spokane Crime Victims Service Center
24 Hour Crisis Center
1-866-751-7119

Other Resources Available in the Spokane Area:
Spokane County Drug and Alcohol Treatment Resource Directory.


If you want to learn more about drug abuse or find information on particular drugs, the following links can be useful:

Drug dependence/abuse information by WebMD

Drug information and parenting advice

NIDA for Teens: The Science Behind Drug Abuse

The Partnership at DrugFree.org has information for parents in English and in Spanish, along with a drug guide


Drug Facts and Information pages courtesy of TOGETHER!.

 

Stimulants

Cocaine

Slang terms: coke, dust, toot, snow, blow, sneeze, powerder, lines, rock (crack)

The word "cocaine" refers to an illegal drug in both a powder (cocaine) and crystal (crack) form. Cocaine stimulates the central nervous system, causing a short-lived high that is immediately follow by intense feelings of depression and edginess and a craving for more of the dug. It can be snorted as a powder, injected as a liquid or smoked in crystal form.

Physical effects include dilated pupils and increased blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature, which can cause muscle spasms, convulsions, cardiac arrest or respiratory failure. Occasional use by snorting can cause a stuffy or runny nose, while long-term use can permanently damage the nasal tissue. Injecting cocaine with contaminated equipment can cause AIDS, hepatitis and other diseases.

Cocaine is expensive and extremely addictive. Preparation of freebase can result in death or injury from fire or explosion.

Information on cocaine from Partnership at DrugFree.org

Amphetamines and other stimulants

Slang terms for amphetamines: speed, uppers, black beauties, pep pills, Benzedrine, Dexedrine, football, biphetamine

Besides cocaine, other stimulants are amphetamines and methamphetamine. Prescription stimulants – such as Ritalin (methylphenidate), Dexedrine (dextroamphetamine) and Adderall – are used in the treatment of conditions such as ADHD and narcolepsy, but these addictive substances are often illicitly used or abused. Stimulants come as capsules, pills or tablets, and are taken orally or injected. In some cases, they are inhaled. Nicotine and caffeine are also commonly used stimulants.

Physical effects are similar to cocaine, and can include dilated pupils and increased blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature, which can cause muscle spasms, convulsions, cardiac arrest or respiratory failure. Stimulant users may feel restless, anxious and moody. People who use large amounts of amphetamines over a long period of time can develop hallucinations, delusions and paranoia. Like cocaine, all stimulants carry risk of addiction, and cause sleeplessness, weight loss and anxiety.

Information on prescription stimulants from Partnership for a Drug-Free America